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The McDowell Foundation Salon Series conversations support teacher-led research communities who are working to sustain and spread classroom innovations throughout the province.   

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Are you a student in grades K-12 in Saskatchewan? Create a short video showing us why your school is special and why you like spending your time there. Submit your video for a chance to win the $10,000 grand prize or the $7,500 gold star prize.

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  • In 1980, the Department of Education, the Saskatchewan School Trustees Association and the STF cosponsored a provincial women’s conference aimed at dealing with issues related to women or sexism in education.
  • On August 1980, a brief sent to the STF Executive regarding increasing the participation of women led to an Executive decision to move toward a proportionate balance of men and women in naming people to advisory committees, delegations and other areas where people are named or appointed.
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  • Starting in 1971, women with 20 or more insurable weeks could claim up to 15 weeks of maternity benefits through the Unemployment Insurance System, at 66 percent of a mother’s previous salary.
  • In October 1973, the Superannuated Teachers of Saskatchewan organization was formed. Caroline Robins was one of the founding members of this organization, serving as the president of the Saskatoon chapter.
  • In 1973, elementary and high school teachers reached wage parity.
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Emma Stewart (on right, c. 1949) answers mail with the aid of Grace Burtonwood.

As a result of World War II, the shortage of teachers provided married women with an opportunity to return to their teaching careers.

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Myrtle Strangways (c. 1960s)

The lean years of The Great Depression created a hostile climate for single women teachers.

Gladys Ekdahl (Bell) reminisces:

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Preference for hiring male teachers over female teachers was revealed in a letter written to Miss Evelyn J. Simpson by W. McQuay, secretary treasurer of the Tuxford School District No. 2486:

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