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As a result of World War II, the shortage of teachers provided married women with an opportunity to return to their teaching careers.

  • Minimum salary for teachers was legislated in 1940 after STF convinced thousands of teachers to sign an undertaking not to teach for less than $700 per year. For the first time, a statutory minimum for teachers became the law in Saskatchewan.
  • Bargaining by Saskatchewan Teachers’ Federation led to teacher salaries based on experience and qualifications.

 

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The lean years of The Great Depression created a hostile climate for single women teachers.

  • During a Saskatchewan Teachers’ Convention in 1938, one official from the Saskatchewan Department of Education blatantly suggested that the country’s problem with unemployment could be resolved easily if the “55,000 lady teachers in Canada were eliminated from their positions, making way for men who are now walking the streets.”
  • On January 1, 1934, the Saskatchewan Teachers’ Federation was formed with a much-anticipated objective of province-wide representation. Gail Stewart became STF’s first female Vice-President.
  • In 1935, Myrtle Strangways, a career teacher and STF’s second female Vice-President, became the STF representative on the Teachers’ Superannuation Commission. For over 20 years, 1935 to 1956, she played a leading role in the work of the STF to improve teachers’ pensions.
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  • In 1920, Catherine Sheldon-Williams, known as the “grand lady of Saskatchewan education” created the province’s first correspondence school. Within five years, the enrolment increased to 300 applicants.
  • In 1921, only 2 percent of married women in Canada were in the labour force.
  • In 1924, Victoria Tory Miners became the first female public school principal in Saskatoon. She remained in this position at Haultain School until her retirement in 1948.
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  • In response to continuing preference of some trustees to choose male teachers, in 1915, women teachers of Saskatchewan came together to form the Saskatoon Women Teachers’ Association (SWTA). By 1918, with Victoria (Tory) Miners as president, the SWTA became the largest teachers’ local in the province of Saskatchewan. Tory played a vital role in changing the status and working conditions of teachers in Saskatchewan, making her area of focus equal pay for women.
  • In 1916, the Superannuated Teacher Association was founded by Emma Stewart and Flora Henderson.
  • The extensive impact of World War I, 1914-1918, profoundly changed the composition of Saskatchewan teachers. As women entered the classrooms, they were issued provisional teaching certificates to overcome the shortage of male teachers who joined the Canadian army.
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Women have long dominated the teaching profession, so to celebrate Women’s History Month, we look back at the history of Saskatchewan women teachers from 1900 to the present day.

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The 2017 Member Survey results help inform the STF’s continuing efforts to advocate for the best possible environments for student and teacher success.

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Here are the commitments outlined in Dr. Ryan Meili's and Mr. Trent Wotherspoon’s education platforms.

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The Season 2 (2017-18) video series celebrates the passion and professionalism Saskatchewan teachers demonstrate as they help students develop the skills and abilities to succeed. Please share with your contacts. 

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The Pick a Premier campaign got education back on the political agenda for the Saskatchewan Party. We look forward to working with Scott Moe to make education a higher priority for the future of Saskatchewan. 

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#theteacherproject is a series of videos that share the joy, passion and discovery taking place in classrooms and schools in communities across Saskatchewan. View the videos in the series and share them widely with your networks.

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