Education Through Indigenous Worldviews

Policy 1.12 Indigenous Education

Education through Indigenous worldviews cultivates holistic understanding of knowledge, the land, communities, and all relations while emphasizing that Indigenous ways of knowing are foundational to teaching and learning.

Resources

Beyond Shadows: First Nations, Métis and Inuit Student Success

Resource Type: Print
Author: Pamela Rose Toulouse, Laurentian University
Publisher: Canadian Teachers’ Federation, 2013

This paper addresses themes that emerged from the Canadian Teachers’ Federation (CTF) July 2013 President’s Forum on First Nations, Métis and Inuit (FNMI) education. Strategies, programs and wise practices for wholistic Indigenous student success in Canada are highlighted and discussed. Current research focusing on equitable education environments based in social justice philosophies, inter-agency approaches, culturally relevant pedagogy, system wide change and inclusion are presented. A highly visual journey navigates the complexity and necessity for immediate action aimed at fostering understanding between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples as key. Advice, teachings, models and principles from students, educators, researchers, leaders, Elders and other stakeholders on Indigenous student success are infused throughout.

Bi-Gwen: Coming Home – Truth Telling from the Sixties Scoop

Resource Type: Video
Publisher: Legacy of Hope Foundation

The Legacy of Hope Foundation (LHF) is a national, Indigenous-led, charitable organization with a mandate to educate and raise awareness about the history and existing intergenerational impacts of the Residential School System (RSS) and subsequent Sixties Scoop (SS) on Indigenous (First Nations, Inuit, and Métis) Survivors, their descendants, and their communities to promote healing and Reconciliation.

LHF created videos of survivors sharing their stories about their experiences during the Sixties Scoop as part of The Legacy of Hope Foundation’s exhibition called Bi-Giwen: Coming Home, Truth Telling from the Sixties Scoop. The videos are available in English only.

(To find the links to these videos, scroll to the bottom of the Videos webpage.)

iPortal - Indigenous Studies Portal Research Tool

Resource Type: Print, Website, Media (video, podcast, blog, audio files)
Organizer: University of Saskatchewan Library

The Indigenous Studies Portal (iPortal) is a database of full-text electronic resources such as articles, e-books, theses, government publications, videos, oral histories, and digitized archival documents and photographs. The iPortal content has a primary focus on Indigenous peoples of Canada with a secondary focus on North American materials and beyond.

This initiative began in 2005 at the University of Saskatchewan as a resource for faculty, students, researchers, and members of the community and currently links to about 65,000 items. Anyone can use the freely available materials in the iPortal but some resources are licensed and may only be available from your library.

Areas of focus include:

  • Governance
  • Law
  • History
  • Economic development
  • Indigenous knowledge
  • Health
  • Education
  • Culture and society
  • Spirituality
  • Arts and literature
  • Research methods
  • Science
  • Miscellaneous

Listen to the Knowledge of the Elders

Resource Type: Website, Video
Author: The National Centre for Collaboration for Indigenous Education (NCCIE)
Publisher: First Nations University of Canada

The internet is filled with videos of Elders, Knowledge Holders, and Indigenous scholars sharing some of their knowledge and wisdom. NCCIE has created this catalogue, which is a sampling of what is on the world wide web. Over 200 videos pertaining to more than twenty First Nations, Métis, and Inuit ways of knowing and being from across Canada appear in this searchable resource related to:

  • Language Revitalization
  • Creation Stories
  • Storytelling
  • Teachings
  • Philosophy
  • Art and Music
  • Ceremonies
  • Governance
  • Protocols
  • The Land
  • Treaties
  • Medicines

The National Centre for Collaboration in Indigenous Education – Knowledge Space

Resource Type: Print, Website, Media
Author: The National Centre for Collaboration in Indigenous Education (NCCIE)

With the expanding digital age, relying solely on paper and two-dimensional representations of Indigenous knowledges has given way to being able once again to privilege voices over written words.

NCCIE has been honoured to work with kêhtê-ayak, the Elders at First Nations University of Canada, who have bravely embarked on a journey with NCCIE to explore the opportunities to learn visually and orally through the World Wide Web and documentary filmmaking.

We have grounded this journey in ceremony and have asked for blessings of the ancestors to guide this work in good ways. We have been careful to consider what can and cannot be shared.

This knowledge space is just a beginning.

The spirit and intent of what is being shared in this space is to awaken people to the importance of Indigenous knowledges in today’s world.

The National Centre for Collaboration in Indigenous Education Playlists – Land-Based Learning, Cultural Knowledge, and Strengthening and Reclaiming Languages

Resource Type: Website, Video
Author: The National Centre for Collaboration in Indigenous Education (NCCIE)
Publisher: First Nations University of Canada

The National Centre for Collaboration in Indigenous Education provides three featured playlists:

  1. Land-Based Learning: The ten videos in this playlist highlight land-based learning and the strong connections between land, language, and culture for Indigenous Peoples.
  2. Cultural Knowledge: The ten videos in this playlist highlight how cultural knowledge is being passed onto next generations through art, music, ceremonies, being on the land, and so much more. You will also hear how learning about one's culture contributes to healing and health and wellness.
  3. Strengthening and Reclaiming Languages: The ten videos in this playlist highlight language education programs as well as the central role of Indigenous languages in passing on one's culture and identity. They also highlight the strong connection between land and language.

The National Centre for Collaboration in Indigenous Education Teaching Resource Centre

Resource Type: Print, Website, Video
Author: The National Centre for Collaboration in Indigenous Education (NCCIE)
Publisher: First Nations University of Canada

NCCIE’s Teaching Resource Centre provides educational resources for Indigenous and non-Indigenous educators teaching students and learners of all ages.
You will find:

  • Lesson plans developed with an Indigenous perspective for teaching:
    • Indigenous, land-based skills and knowledge.
    • Indigenous languages.
    • Mainstream K-12 subjects infused with Indigenous knowledge.
  • Some lesson plans are adaptable for professional development opportunities.
  • Videos that can be used as part of lesson plans or on their own.
  • Helpful materials to:
    • Evaluate your and your learners’ experiences with a lesson.
    • Create your own lesson plans using templates with an Indigenous-based, student-centred approach.

Lesson plans are provided for the following subject areas:

  • Indigenous Languages
  • Indigenous Ways of Knowing and Being
  • On-the-Land
  • Art
  • Music
  • Commerce or Business
  • Careers
  • Science
  • Biology
  • Math
  • Nutrition
  • Family and Parenting
  • History
  • Social Studies

Weaving Indigenous Education into Your Practice: A Teacher’s Resource Guide is also linked to the top of the main page. This virtual guide comprises a playlist of five video chapters, which illustrate how teachers can weave interviews, videos, and lesson plans from NCCIE.ca into their practices. Elementary and secondary teachers who are new to Indigenous education can use this guide when introducing Indigenous lesson plans into their classrooms and land-based learning.

The National Centre for Collaboration in Indigenous Education Resource Library

Resource Type: Website
Author: The National Centre for Collaboration in Indigenous Education (NCCIE)
Publisher: First Nations University of Canada

This searchable database features a diverse array of documents and on-line resources about and for Indigenous education across Canada. These resources include articles, books, education agreements, government funding, journals, online courses, online magazines, organizations or centres, policy handbooks, school programs, reports, strategic plans, teaching resources and videos.

Native Land Digital

Resource Type: Website
Publisher: Native Land Digital

Native Land is an app to help map Indigenous territories, treaties and languages. Native Land Digital strives to create and foster conversations about the history of colonialism, Indigenous ways of knowing, and settler-Indigenous relations, through educational resources such as our map and Territory Acknowledgement Guide. We strive to go beyond old ways of talking about Indigenous people and to develop a platform where Indigenous communities can represent themselves and their histories on their own terms. In doing so, Native Land Digital creates spaces where non-Indigenous people can be invited and challenged to learn more about the lands they inhabit, the history of those lands, and how to actively be part of a better future going forward together.

How Native Land Digital works:

  • Mapping: We strive to map Indigenous territories, treaties, and languages across the world in a way that goes beyond colonial ways of thinking in order to better represent how Indigenous people want to see themselves.
  • Education: We provide educational resources to correct the way that people speak about colonialism and Indigeneity, and to encourage territory awareness in everyday speech and action.
  • Community: As an Indigenous-led organization, we interconnect Indigenous communities around the world and develop real relationships.

Telling Our Twisted Histories (CBC Podcast)

Resource Type: Podcast
Presenter: Kaniehti:io Horn
Publisher: CBC Listen

Words connect us. Words hurt us. Indigenous histories have been twisted by centuries of colonization. Host Kaniehti:io Horn brings us together to decolonize our minds – one word, one concept, one story at a time.

Kaniehti:io Horn explores concepts such as:

  • Reconciliation
  • God
  • Obey
  • Bannock
  • Pocahontas
  • Savage
  • Indian Time
  • Family Names
  • School
  • Reserve
  • Discovery

Walking Together: First Nations, Métis and Inuit Perspectives in Curriculum

Resource Type: Print, Website, Video
Organization: Alberta Education/Learn Alberta

The digital resource Walking Together: First Nations, Métis and Inuit Perspectives in Curriculum was designed to help teachers understand the holistic nature of First Nations, Métis and Inuit ways of knowing; to provide opportunity for Inuit, First Nations and Métis peoples to share their perspectives on topics important to them; and to demonstrate First Nations, Métis and Inuit perspectives in teaching and learning experiences.

This interactive resource uses the 4-part framework of Beginning Together, Respecting Wisdom, Observing Practice and Exploring Connections to explore the following areas:

  • Kinship
  • Aboriginal and Treaty rights
  • Healing historical trauma
  • Worldviews
  • Oral tradition
  • Elders
  • Symbolism and traditions
  • Connection to the land
  • Indigenous pedagogy
  • Culture and language
  • Well-being
  • Traditional environmental knowledge

Talking Together, a discussion guide for Walking Together: First Nations, Métis and Inuit Perspectives in Curriculum, contains practical ideas for school leaders and teachers to explore the resource in groups or individually. Sample workshops and activities are designed for teachers, administrators, school board members, school council members, parents and community members.

iPortal - Indigenous Studies Portal Research Tool

Resource Type: Print, Website, Media (video, podcast, blog, audio files)
Organizer: University of Saskatchewan Library

The Indigenous Studies Portal (iPortal) is a database of full-text electronic resources such as articles, e-books, theses, government publications, videos, oral histories, and digitized archival documents and photographs. The iPortal content has a primary focus on Indigenous peoples of Canada with a secondary focus on North American materials and beyond.

This initiative began in 2005 at the University of Saskatchewan as a resource for faculty, students, researchers, and members of the community and currently links to about 65,000 items. Anyone can use the freely available materials in the iPortal but some resources are licensed and may only be available from your library.

Areas of focus include:

  • Governance
  • Law
  • History
  • Economic development
  • Indigenous knowledge
  • Health
  • Education
  • Culture and society
  • Spirituality
  • Arts and literature
  • Research methods
  • Science
  • Miscellaneous

Native Land Digital

Resource Type: Website
Publisher: Native Land Digital

Native Land is an app to help map Indigenous territories, treaties and languages. Native Land Digital strives to create and foster conversations about the history of colonialism, Indigenous ways of knowing, and settler-Indigenous relations, through educational resources such as our map and Territory Acknowledgement Guide. We strive to go beyond old ways of talking about Indigenous people and to develop a platform where Indigenous communities can represent themselves and their histories on their own terms. In doing so, Native Land Digital creates spaces where non-Indigenous people can be invited and challenged to learn more about the lands they inhabit, the history of those lands, and how to actively be part of a better future going forward together.

How Native Land Digital works:

  • Mapping: We strive to map Indigenous territories, treaties, and languages across the world in a way that goes beyond colonial ways of thinking in order to better represent how Indigenous people want to see themselves.
  • Education: We provide educational resources to correct the way that people speak about colonialism and Indigeneity, and to encourage territory awareness in everyday speech and action.
  • Community: As an Indigenous-led organization, we interconnect Indigenous communities around the world and develop real relationships.

Bison As Teachers - Wanuskewin Lesson Resources

Resource Type: Print
Author: Wanuskewin and the Saskatchewan Teachers’ Federation in partnership
Publisher: Saskatchewan Teachers’ Federation

This resource was created by Saskatchewan teachers and provides pre- and post-visit lessons for educators planning a class trip to Wanuskewin to tour the site and learn about the return of the bison herd. This resource provides lesson ideas, resources and background information for the educator, as well as links to Saskatchewan curriculum focused on the Grade 4 level, with applicability to other grades as well.

Available in English

The Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan – Aboriginal (First Nations and Métis)

Resource Type: Print, Website
Author: Canadian Plains Research Center, University of Regina

The Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan provides an array of entries on topics such as:

  • Aboriginal artists and writers
  • Aboriginal education
  • Aboriginal health
  • Aboriginal fishing and hunting rights
  • Aboriginal justice
  • Aboriginal languages
  • Aboriginal Peoples of Saskatchewan
  • Aboriginal treaty rights
  • First Nations and Métis leaders
  • First Nations in Saskatchewan
  • First Nations economic development
  • First Nations governance
  • First Nations land claims
  • Indigenous organizations and institutions
  • Métis communities
  • Métis culture and language
  • Métis education
  • Métis history; scrip
  • Non-status Indians
  • North-West Resistance
  • Treaties
  • Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK)
  • Urban reserves

Gabriel Dumont Institute of Native Studies and Applied Research Virtual Museum of Métis History and Culture

Resource Type: Print, Website, Other Media, Art, Craft, Beadwork
Author: Gabriel Dumont Institute

The mission of the Gabriel Dumont Institute (GDI) is to promote the renewal and development of Métis culture through research; materials development, collection, and distribution; and the design, development, and delivery of Métis-specific educational programs and services.

The Gabriel Dumont Institute Virtual Museum of Métis History and Culture provides virtual access to collections, exhibits, learning resources, Michif tools, and an interactive tour called Back to Batoche.

Virtual collections include:

  • Archival Collection
  • Art and Artifact Collection
  • Biography and Essay Collection
  • Bungee Collection
  • Community Events, Music and Dance Collection
  • Learning Resources Collection
  • Michif Collection
  • New Nation – New Breed Collection
  • Oral History and Traditional Stories Collection

Exhibits include:

  • Beverley Worsley Collection
  • Gabriel Dumont Institute Culture and Heritage Gallery
  • Image Collection
  • John Boucher Collection
  • Olive Dickason Collection
  • Stories of Our People/ Lii zistwayr di la naasyoon di Michif Comic Series
  • What’s New!
  • The National Métis Veterans’ Memorial Monument

Learning Resources include:

  • Bringing Métis Children’s Literature to Life: Teacher Guidebook
  • How to Fingerweave
  • Métis Governance in Saskatchewan
  • Lesson Plans and Miscellaneous Resources

Michif Tools include:

  • Heritage Michif Dictionary
  • Northern Michif Dictionary
  • Heritage Michif Lessons

Access Back to Batoche to take the interactive tour on the colourful history and culture of the past and present Batoche.

Indigenous Saskatchewan Encyclopedia

Resource Type: Print, Website
Author: University of Saskatchewan
Publisher: University of Regina Press

The Indigenous Saskatchewan Encyclopedia features over 200 entries about Saskatchewan’s Indigenous history.

In 2005, the Canadian Plains Research Centre, University of Regina Press created the single, largest, educational publishing project in Saskatchewan's history, the Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan, to celebrate Saskatchewan’s centennial anniversary. The encyclopedia was publicly available online until mid-2018. Within this encyclopedia were a significant number of resources that documented Saskatchewan’s numerous Indigenous Peoples’ histories, significant figures and events. With permission from the University of Regina Press, the Gwenna Moss Centre for Teaching and Learning and Indigenous Voices offer these resources on our website as they were originally published.

Our goal in providing these articles is to offer a starting point for the many people who are interested in learning more about the histories of the Indigenous Peoples of Saskatchewan. These great resources are not perfect examples of historical and contemporary truths, due to the ever-changing nature of truth in Canada, but they do provide a broad overview to answer many questions and to stimulate many conversations.

iPortal - Indigenous Studies Portal Research Tool

Resource Type: Print, Website, Media (video, podcast, blog, audio files)
Organizer: University of Saskatchewan Library

The Indigenous Studies Portal (iPortal) is a database of full-text electronic resources such as articles, e-books, theses, government publications, videos, oral histories, and digitized archival documents and photographs. The iPortal content has a primary focus on Indigenous peoples of Canada with a secondary focus on North American materials and beyond.

This initiative began in 2005 at the University of Saskatchewan as a resource for faculty, students, researchers, and members of the community and currently links to about 65,000 items. Anyone can use the freely available materials in the iPortal but some resources are licensed and may only be available from your library.

Areas of focus include:

  • Governance
  • Law
  • History
  • Economic development
  • Indigenous knowledge
  • Health
  • Education
  • Culture and society
  • Spirituality
  • Arts and literature
  • Research methods
  • Science
  • Miscellaneous

Listen to the Knowledge of the Elders

Resource Type: Website, Video
Author: The National Centre for Collaboration for Indigenous Education (NCCIE)
Publisher: First Nations University of Canada

The internet is filled with videos of Elders, Knowledge Holders, and Indigenous scholars sharing some of their knowledge and wisdom. NCCIE has created this catalogue, which is a sampling of what is on the world wide web. Over 200 videos pertaining to more than twenty First Nations, Métis, and Inuit ways of knowing and being from across Canada appear in this searchable resource related to:

  • Language Revitalization
  • Creation Stories
  • Storytelling
  • Teachings
  • Philosophy
  • Art and Music
  • Ceremonies
  • Governance
  • Protocols
  • The Land
  • Treaties
  • Medicines

The National Centre for Collaboration in Indigenous Education Playlists – Land-Based Learning, Cultural Knowledge, and Strengthening and Reclaiming Languages

Resource Type: Website, Video
Author: The National Centre for Collaboration in Indigenous Education (NCCIE)
Publisher: First Nations University of Canada

The National Centre for Collaboration in Indigenous Education provides three featured playlists:

  1. Land-Based Learning: The ten videos in this playlist highlight land-based learning and the strong connections between land, language, and culture for Indigenous Peoples.
  2. Cultural Knowledge: The ten videos in this playlist highlight how cultural knowledge is being passed onto next generations through art, music, ceremonies, being on the land, and so much more. You will also hear how learning about one's culture contributes to healing and health and wellness.
  3. Strengthening and Reclaiming Languages: The ten videos in this playlist highlight language education programs as well as the central role of Indigenous languages in passing on one's culture and identity. They also highlight the strong connection between land and language.

The National Centre for Collaboration in Indigenous Education Teaching Resource Centre

Resource Type: Print, Website, Video
Author: The National Centre for Collaboration in Indigenous Education (NCCIE)
Publisher: First Nations University of Canada

NCCIE’s Teaching Resource Centre provides educational resources for Indigenous and non-Indigenous educators teaching students and learners of all ages.
You will find:

  • Lesson plans developed with an Indigenous perspective for teaching:
    • Indigenous, land-based skills and knowledge.
    • Indigenous languages.
    • Mainstream K-12 subjects infused with Indigenous knowledge.
  • Some lesson plans are adaptable for professional development opportunities.
  • Videos that can be used as part of lesson plans or on their own.
  • Helpful materials to:
    • Evaluate your and your learners’ experiences with a lesson.
    • Create your own lesson plans using templates with an Indigenous-based, student-centred approach.

Lesson plans are provided for the following subject areas:

  • Indigenous Languages
  • Indigenous Ways of Knowing and Being
  • On-the-Land
  • Art
  • Music
  • Commerce or Business
  • Careers
  • Science
  • Biology
  • Math
  • Nutrition
  • Family and Parenting
  • History
  • Social Studies

Weaving Indigenous Education into Your Practice: A Teacher’s Resource Guide is also linked to the top of the main page. This virtual guide comprises a playlist of five video chapters, which illustrate how teachers can weave interviews, videos, and lesson plans from NCCIE.ca into their practices. Elementary and secondary teachers who are new to Indigenous education can use this guide when introducing Indigenous lesson plans into their classrooms and land-based learning.

Native Land Digital

Resource Type: Website
Publisher: Native Land Digital

Native Land is an app to help map Indigenous territories, treaties and languages. Native Land Digital strives to create and foster conversations about the history of colonialism, Indigenous ways of knowing, and settler-Indigenous relations, through educational resources such as our map and Territory Acknowledgement Guide. We strive to go beyond old ways of talking about Indigenous people and to develop a platform where Indigenous communities can represent themselves and their histories on their own terms. In doing so, Native Land Digital creates spaces where non-Indigenous people can be invited and challenged to learn more about the lands they inhabit, the history of those lands, and how to actively be part of a better future going forward together.

How Native Land Digital works:

  • Mapping: We strive to map Indigenous territories, treaties, and languages across the world in a way that goes beyond colonial ways of thinking in order to better represent how Indigenous people want to see themselves.
  • Education: We provide educational resources to correct the way that people speak about colonialism and Indigeneity, and to encourage territory awareness in everyday speech and action.
  • Community: As an Indigenous-led organization, we interconnect Indigenous communities around the world and develop real relationships.

Office of the Treaty Commissioner

Resource Type: Print, Website
Organization: Office of the Treaty Commissioner (OTC)

The mission of the Office of the Treaty Commissioner in Saskatchewan is unique with the Office playing a two-fold role: first, to support the bi-lateral Treaty Table process between the Government of Canada and the Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations, and second, to advocate for and build a strong relationship between First Nations and non-First Nations people in Saskatchewan to ensure an effective response among Saskatchewan citizens to support a shared destiny.

The OTC provides resources on Reconciliation and Treaties, events, workshops, public speakers, language classes, links to resources, as well as a library and archive.

Supporting Reconciliation in Saskatchewan Schools – Sixties Scoop

Resource Type: Website
Organization: Ministry of Education – Government of Saskatchewan

The Sixties Scoop refers to a period in Saskatchewan’s history when Indigenous children were removed from their parents and communities by provincial child welfare services. Status, non-status, Métis and Inuit children were placed for adoption and/or foster care and were raised outside of their communities without the influences of their Indigenous culture, values and languages. This section contains a list of resources and curriculum connections for teachers to address with their students.

Access links to:

  • Sixties Scoop Resources on the curriculum website.
  • Module 2: The Sixties Scoop (professional learning module): The purpose of this support material is to assist educators in using collaborative inquiry to engage in conversations and develop actions to deepen their own, their students’ and communities’ understanding of the sixties scoop and its legacies in Saskatchewan.

These materials may be used in a variety of contexts such as staff meetings, professional learning groups, workshops, school councils and community gatherings. The sample questions for conversations and actions may also be useful for individual teacher reflection and planning. It is important to involve First Nations and Métis Elders and community leaders in planning and dialogue concerning the sixties scoop.

This professional learning module has been developed to help guide staffs through initial conversations and help them to develop a plan moving forward.

Whitecap Dakota Lessons

Resource Type: Print, Website
Author: Whitecap Dakota First Nation

A joint initiative between Saskatoon Public Schools and Whitecap Dakota First Nation, this is a collaborative project designed to foster reconciliation by educating students on the Dakota perspectives of their history, culture, and language. This site hosts lessons for Kindergarten to Grade 8, as well as lessons designed for use with the interpretive walls located at the Chief Whitecap School and other Saskatoon Public Schools. The Dakota education material and resources were compiled in consultation with Whitecap Dakota Elders and educators. Lessons for Kindergarten to Grade 8 have been designed in consultation with education professionals to meet Saskatchewan curriculum requirements.

iPortal - Indigenous Studies Portal Research Tool

Resource Type: Print, Website, Media (video, podcast, blog, audio files)
Organizer: University of Saskatchewan Library

The Indigenous Studies Portal (iPortal) is a database of full-text electronic resources such as articles, e-books, theses, government publications, videos, oral histories, and digitized archival documents and photographs. The iPortal content has a primary focus on Indigenous peoples of Canada with a secondary focus on North American materials and beyond.

This initiative began in 2005 at the University of Saskatchewan as a resource for faculty, students, researchers, and members of the community and currently links to about 65,000 items. Anyone can use the freely available materials in the iPortal but some resources are licensed and may only be available from your library.

Areas of focus include:

  • Governance
  • Law
  • History
  • Economic development
  • Indigenous knowledge
  • Health
  • Education
  • Culture and society
  • Spirituality
  • Arts and literature
  • Research methods
  • Science
  • Miscellaneous

Native Land Digital

Resource Type: Website
Publisher: Native Land Digital

Native Land is an app to help map Indigenous territories, treaties and languages. Native Land Digital strives to create and foster conversations about the history of colonialism, Indigenous ways of knowing, and settler-Indigenous relations, through educational resources such as our map and Territory Acknowledgement Guide. We strive to go beyond old ways of talking about Indigenous people and to develop a platform where Indigenous communities can represent themselves and their histories on their own terms. In doing so, Native Land Digital creates spaces where non-Indigenous people can be invited and challenged to learn more about the lands they inhabit, the history of those lands, and how to actively be part of a better future going forward together.

How Native Land Digital works:

  • Mapping: We strive to map Indigenous territories, treaties, and languages across the world in a way that goes beyond colonial ways of thinking in order to better represent how Indigenous people want to see themselves.
  • Education: We provide educational resources to correct the way that people speak about colonialism and Indigeneity, and to encourage territory awareness in everyday speech and action.
  • Community: As an Indigenous-led organization, we interconnect Indigenous communities around the world and develop real relationships.

Bison As Teachers - Wanuskewin Lesson Resources

Resource Type: Print
Author: Wanuskewin and the Saskatchewan Teachers’ Federation in partnership
Publisher: Saskatchewan Teachers’ Federation

This resource was created by Saskatchewan teachers and provides pre- and post-visit lessons for educators planning a class trip to Wanuskewin to tour the site and learn about the return of the bison herd. This resource provides lesson ideas, resources and background information for the educator, as well as links to Saskatchewan curriculum focused on the Grade 4 level, with applicability to other grades as well.

Available in English

Gabriel Dumont Institute Michif Languages Resource List

Resource Type: Print
Organization: Gabriel Dumont Institute of Native Studies and Applied Research

The Gabriel Dumont Institute (GDI) works with Michif speakers to preserve and promote the three Michif languages spoken in Saskatchewan: Michif, Michif-French, and Northern Michif. Spoken mainly in southern and central Saskatchewan and Manitoba and ranging into North Dakota (the area in and around the Turtle Mountain Reservation) and some parts of Montana, Michif is considered by linguists to be the true mixed Métis language. It mixes Plains Cree verbs and verb phrases and French nouns and noun phrases along with some Nahkawē (Saulteaux) and English, depending on the locale and family. Michif-French, spoken in various places in all three Prairie Provinces, is a dialect of Canadian French that sometimes employs an Algonquian syntax. Northern Michif, spoken in northwest Saskatchewan, is a dialect of Plains Cree with a tiny number of French loan words.

This resource list itemizes resources containing varying degrees of Michif that can be obtained through the Gabriel Dumont Institute.

Gabriel Dumont Institute of Native Studies and Applied Research Virtual Museum of Métis History and Culture

Resource Type: Print, Website, Other Media, Art, Craft, Beadwork
Author: Gabriel Dumont Institute

The mission of the Gabriel Dumont Institute (GDI) is to promote the renewal and development of Métis culture through research; materials development, collection, and distribution; and the design, development, and delivery of Métis-specific educational programs and services.

The Gabriel Dumont Institute Virtual Museum of Métis History and Culture provides virtual access to collections, exhibits, learning resources, Michif tools, and an interactive tour called Back to Batoche.

Virtual collections include:

  • Archival Collection
  • Art and Artifact Collection
  • Biography and Essay Collection
  • Bungee Collection
  • Community Events, Music and Dance Collection
  • Learning Resources Collection
  • Michif Collection
  • New Nation – New Breed Collection
  • Oral History and Traditional Stories Collection

Exhibits include:

  • Beverley Worsley Collection
  • Gabriel Dumont Institute Culture and Heritage Gallery
  • Image Collection
  • John Boucher Collection
  • Olive Dickason Collection
  • Stories of Our People/ Lii zistwayr di la naasyoon di Michif Comic Series
  • What’s New!
  • The National Métis Veterans’ Memorial Monument

Learning Resources include:

  • Bringing Métis Children’s Literature to Life: Teacher Guidebook
  • How to Fingerweave
  • Métis Governance in Saskatchewan
  • Lesson Plans and Miscellaneous Resources

Michif Tools include:

  • Heritage Michif Dictionary
  • Northern Michif Dictionary
  • Heritage Michif Lessons

Access Back to Batoche to take the interactive tour on the colourful history and culture of the past and present Batoche.

Heritage Michif Dictionary

Resource Type: Print, Website, Audio Files
Author: Norman Fleury
Organization: Gabriel Dumont Institute of Native Studies and Applied Research

This online dictionary features over 11,500 translations and audio pronunciations by Michif-language expert Norman Fleury. A search tool allows users to look up the English word to find the Michif translations.

This project was developed by the Gabriel Dumont Institute and was funded through the Department of Canadian Heritage's Aboriginal Languages Initiative.

Heritage Michif Lessons

Resource Type: Print, Website, Audio Files
Author: Norman Fleury
Organization: Gabriel Dumont Institute of Native Studies and Applied Research

Featuring over 1000 words and phrases to learn in over 60 exercises, with audio pronunciations by Michif-language expert Norman Fleury.

The Gabriel Dumont Institute acknowledges funding support for this project through the Office of the Federal Interlocutor for Métis and Non-Status Indians, Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada.

Northern Michif Dictionary

Resource Type: Print, Website, Audio Files
Author: Vince Ahenakew
Organization: Gabriel Dumont Institute of Native Studies and Applied Research

This online dictionary features over 18,000 translations and audio pronunciations by Northern Michif-language expert Vince Ahenakew. A search tool allows users to look up the English word to find the Northern Michif translation.

This project was developed by the Gabriel Dumont Institute, and acknowledges the financial support of the Government of Canada for the production of this resource.

Office of the Treaty Commissioner

Resource Type: Print, Website
Organization: Office of the Treaty Commissioner (OTC)

The mission of the Office of the Treaty Commissioner in Saskatchewan is unique with the Office playing a two-fold role: first, to support the bi-lateral Treaty Table process between the Government of Canada and the Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations, and second, to advocate for and build a strong relationship between First Nations and non-First Nations people in Saskatchewan to ensure an effective response among Saskatchewan citizens to support a shared destiny.

The OTC provides resources on Reconciliation and Treaties, events, workshops, public speakers, language classes, links to resources, as well as a library and archive.

Whitecap Dakota Lessons

Resource Type: Print, Website
Author: Whitecap Dakota First Nation

A joint initiative between Saskatoon Public Schools and Whitecap Dakota First Nation, this is a collaborative project designed to foster reconciliation by educating students on the Dakota perspectives of their history, culture, and language. This site hosts lessons for Kindergarten to Grade 8, as well as lessons designed for use with the interpretive walls located at the Chief Whitecap School and other Saskatoon Public Schools. The Dakota education material and resources were compiled in consultation with Whitecap Dakota Elders and educators. Lessons for Kindergarten to Grade 8 have been designed in consultation with education professionals to meet Saskatchewan curriculum requirements.

Land Acknowledgement: What is it? Why should we do it? How do we create one?

Resource Type: Blog
Author: Amanda Nelson
Publisher/Organization: Prairie Spirit School Division: Just another Prairie Spirit Blogs site

Amanda Nelson, a Prairie Spirit educator, shares in her blog post what land acknowledgments are, along with examples and processes for co-creation with students.

Land Acknowledgements - Territorial Acknowledgements: Going Beyond the Script

Resource Type: Website, Video
Organization: University of Alberta: Centre for Teaching and Learning

Have you ever wondered how to create your own territorial acknowledgement, or why you might want to create one? With help and guidance from University of Alberta faculty and staff, you, too, can create personal, meaningful, and impactful territorial acknowledgements. Watch the full-length video.

Native Land Digital Resources: Territory Acknowledgement – Why Acknowledge Territory?

Resource Type: Website
Author: Allison Jones et al.
Publisher/Organization: Native Land Digital

A webpage with information and resources on why and how we can acknowledge territory as a way to insert an awareness of Indigenous presence and land rights in everyday life.

Territorial Land Acknowledgement Tips Worksheet

Resource Type: Print

In our daily travels, we are attendees, participants and facilitators at multiple events in a given week. Usually, one will hear a land acknowledgement at the beginning of a gathering that is the standard of that organization and from which there is little deviation. We have been doing a lot of thinking about what a land acknowledgement means to us and what our connection to Treaty is. Our hope for you is simply to provide you with some time and space to think about how to reframe a territorial land acknowledgement in a more personal and meaningful way.

Resource Type: Video

What’s wrong with land acknowledgments, and how to make them better

Resource Type: Website, Video
Author: Ka’nhehsí:io Deer
Organization: CBC News

A CBC news article that gathers the thinking, advice and expectations of five First Nations interviewees about what’s wrong with land acknowledgments and how to make them better.

The video of the Baroness von Sketch Show’s satirical take on land acknowledgements is included.

Why Do a Land Acknowledgement - Living Skies School Division

Resource Type: Video
Organization: Living Sky School Division

Watch this grassroots video created by staff and students in Living Sky School Division on the importance of land acknowledgements.

LSSD Video Descriptor: Taking action toward reconciliation is a priority for Living Sky School Division. We often hear land acknowledgements at school, special events and public occasions and wanted to explore their purpose and significance. We believe that land acknowledgments are a positive action we can take to address our shared history and honour the sacred treaty relationship. When they are spoken with depth of understanding and positive intent, they contribute to restoring and building trust in our education system and across our communities.

The National Centre for Collaboration in Indigenous Education: Reconciliation and NCCIE

Resource Type: Print, Website
Publisher: The National Centre for Collaboration in Indigenous Education (NCCIE)

The NCCIE website provides educational resources to support and encourage a strong national presence for collaboration in Indigenous education across Canada. NCCIE.CA is meant to support this key element of reconciliation – education. NCCIE.CA serves as the gateway for educators across the country – and anyone interested in Indigenous education and reconciliation, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous – to share and learn from one another. The NCCIE library aims to grow to include a wide array of Indigenous educational programs and experiences suitable for Indigenous and non-Indigenous students everywhere and of all ages.

The Teacher Resource centre provides resources, materials, lessons, and videos in English and many other languages including: Algonquin, Cree, Dene Sųłiné, English, French, Innu, Kaska, Maliseet, Michif, North Slavey, Oji-Cree, Ojibway, Saulteaux

Office of the Treaty Commissioner – Reconciliation

Resource Type: Website
Publisher: Office of the Treaty Commissioner (OTC)

The Office of the Treaty Commissioner has been working with hundreds of partner organizations since 2014 to develop a common Vision for Truth and Reconciliation through Treaty Implementation. In this process, we have asked thousands of Indigenous and non-Indigenous citizens from Saskatchewan about the Reconciliation story they would like to tell in a generation. We believe that if we can come together on a common vision for success, that we can better work together, and determine whether progress is being made.

Saskatchewan residents have told us that Truth and Reconciliation through Treaty Implementation is about walking together on a journey to create a new, shared future for our children and grandchildren. They've told us that it involves four overlapping and continuous areas of work:

  • Shared Understanding of Our History
  • Vibrant Cultures and Worldviews
  • Systems that Benefit Us All
  • Authentic Relationships

The OTC provides examples of Reconciliation in action in communities, organizations and the province. The OTC hopes to inspire Reconciliation actions and provides direction and guidance for local Reconciliation actions.

Reflections on Truth and Reconciliation with Honourable Murray Sinclair

Resource Type: Video
Publisher: National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation, University of Manitoba

In this 33-minute video recorded for Truth and Reconciliation Week 2021, Honourable Murray Sinclair speaks to youth (Grades 5-12) about:

  • the purpose of residential schools;
  • the history of industrial and residential schools and how they connect to settlement and Treaty-making;
  • how Indigenous families were forced to send their children to these schools;
  • what he and the other commissioners of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission learned from survivors about their experiences in residential schools;
  • the messages that Canadian society was receiving about Indigenous peoples from the government;
  • the messages that Indigenous students in residential schools and non-Indigenous students in public schools were receiving through their education;
  • the history of white European immigration policies;
  • the benefits that white settlers received;
  • the principle of Indigenous sovereignty and the historical connection to the Royal Proclamation of 1763;
  • the reports of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission;
  • the need for Indigenous youth to learn about their identities and histories; and
  • what youth need to do to embark on the path of Truth and Reconciliation

Supporting Reconciliation in Saskatchewan Schools

Resource Type: Website
Publisher: Ministry of Education – Government of Saskatchewan

This site has been created to support school staffs to work together to expand their understanding of truth and reconciliation as well as the history and legacy of residential schools. It contains tools and resources to support important conversations and professional development opportunities.

This space will continue to grow and evolve as resources are identified and experiences are shared. The intent is that this site will be created collaboratively, in the true nature of reconciliation. Please join the discussion to share what your school is doing to support student understanding and to help bring about reconciliation in our province and our country.

Access links to:

  • Treaty Education Learning Resource
  • TRC Calls to Action
  • What is Reconciliation?
  • History and Legacy of Residential Schools
  • Moving Forward towards achieving reconciliation (ideas for individuals, classrooms and school communities)
  • Recommended learning resources about the history and legacy of residential schools, truth and reconciliation
  • Professional development learning modules
  • Discussion and collaboration
  • Funding opportunities
  • Projects in Saskatchewan

Truth and Reconciliation in Your Classroom - How to get started and who can help

Resource Type: Print, Website
Author: EdCan Network

A print resource with information for educators on how to integrate Truth and Reconciliation in their classrooms. Teachers recognize that infusing Indigenous histories, cultures and perspectives into educational curriculum is a way to contribute towards the goal of reconciliation by providing students with an opportunity to learn about the Indigenous people with whom they share the land, and on whose ancestral territories all Canadians currently reside. This resource and its home website (edcan.ca/inyourclassroom) provide practical strategies and resources for taking those first steps toward reconciliation in classrooms.

Legacy of Hope Foundation Videos

Resource Type: Video
Publisher: Legacy of Hope Foundation

The Legacy of Hope Foundation (LHF) is a national, Indigenous-led, charitable organization with a mandate to educate and raise awareness about the history and existing intergenerational impacts of the Residential School System (RSS) and subsequent Sixties Scoop (SS) on Indigenous (First Nations, Inuit, and Métis) Survivors, their descendants, and their communities to promote healing and Reconciliation.

On their Videos page, the Legacy of Hope Foundation shares galleries of videos featuring individuals who share their experiences related to:

  • Escaping Residential Schools: Running for Their Lives
  • Our Stories, Our Strength
  • Pehonan – Intergenerational Survivors
  • Where are the Children?
  • We Were so Far Away: The Inuit Experience of Residential Schools

Residential School Survivor Stories

Resource Type: Video
Publisher: Legacy of Hope Foundation

The Legacy of Hope Foundation (LHF) is a national, Indigenous-led, charitable organization with a mandate to educate and raise awareness about the history and existing intergenerational impacts of the Residential School System (RSS) and subsequent Sixties Scoop (SS) on Indigenous (First Nations, Inuit, and Métis) Survivors, their descendants, and their communities to promote healing and Reconciliation.

LHF created a selection of Survivor stories drawn from the Our Stories… Our Strength video collection. In these videos, men and women share personal and often painful accounts of their experiences of residential school and its legacy. The Legacy of Hope Foundation believes that it is by sharing these truths that we can all continue to work toward understanding and healing.

Shattering the Silence: The Hidden History of Indian Residential Schools in Saskatchewan

Resource Type: Website, ebook with interactive links
Author: Shuana Niessen
Publisher: Faculty of Education, University of Regina

The Shattering the Silence: The Hidden History of Indian Residential Schools in Saskatchewan ebook is a Project of Heart Saskatchewan resource for teachers.
This book extracts, reorganizes, and compiles the school-specific Saskatchewan elements of the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation reports and primary school documents as well as incorporating other resources and former student accounts that have been recorded and published online. It is an informative and accessible resource for teaching and learning about Indian residential schools in Saskatchewan.

The website offers links to:

  • A map of Indian Residential School Locations in What is Now Saskatchewan.
  • Photographs of Indian Residential Schools in Saskatchewan.
  • Curated resources:
    • non-fiction
    • memoir, autobiography, biography and true
    • fiction
    • youth and children
    • poetry
    • plays
    • videos
    • additional resource links.
  • Saskatchewan Curricular Connections.
  • Inquiry starters.
  • The French ebook.

Stolen Children: Residential School survivors speak out

Resource Type: Video
Publisher: CBC News: The National

In this 18:35 minute video, residential school survivors share how residential schools affected them and their children and grandchildren.

We Were Children

Resource Type: Video
Author: National Film Board
Publisher: CBC Gem

In this 1:23:20 film by the National Film Board, the profound impact of the Canadian government's residential school system is shown through the eyes of two children who were forced to endure unimaginable hardships.

K-9 Treaty Education Learning Resource

Resource Type: Print, Website
Publisher: Office of Treaty Commissioner and Ministry of Education

The Kindergarten to Grade 9 Treaty Education Learning Resource is designed for teachers to assist them in integrating Treaty content and perspective with Saskatchewan’s curricula and is based on the inquiry method of teaching. It provides information about Treaties, First Nations people and the history of what is now known as Saskatchewan, as well as sample learning experiences and suggested resource materials to support teachers in the development of their lessons. 

Office of the Treaty Commissioner – About The Treaties

Resource Type: Website
Publisher: Office of Treaty Commissioner

The OTC provides a Treaty Map of Saskatchewan, background on the history of Treaties in Saskatchewan and Canada, including an interactive Treaty Timeline, and reasons why Treaty is important to Indigenous and non-Indigenous people in Saskatchewan.

Information is also provided on the following:

  • Treaty Backgrounder – Overview of treaties in Saskatchewan.
  • Modern Day Treaties
  • Aboriginal Rights
  • Fur Trade
  • Treaty Implementation Report

The PLEA: Treaties and the Law

Resource Type: Print, Website
Organizer: PLEA: Legal Information for Everyone
Publisher: Law Foundation of Saskatchewan

The land that is now known as Canada was already occupied when Europeans came to live here. As a peaceful, negotiated and mutually agreed upon way of resolving the situation, both First Nations and the British, then later, Canadian governments chose to enter into Treaties. Treaties are solemn agreements that are sacred and made between sovereign nations.

Although the law recognizes that Treaty rights are enforceable rights, implementing the Treaties has been a difficult and complex task. To help better understand the importance of Treaties, this issue of The PLEA examines Treaties and their relationship with Canadian law.

Aboriginal Resource List

Resource Type: Print

Aboriginal resources that will support provincial curricula are available for borrowing at the Emma Stewart Resources Centre. This bibliography provides an annotated list of print and media resources to support your own learning and your classroom practice on topics such as:

  • Ethical, racial, political, and treaty issues
  • Aboriginal rights and sovereignty
  • Impacts of colonialism
  • History of Indigenous peoples, pre- and post-Confederation
  • Indigenous stories and legends
  • Traditional and cultural teachings; Indigenous values
  • Indigenous worldviews and ways of knowing
  • Traditional medicines
  • Indigenous arts, dances, music and games
  • Indigenous cultures and languages
  • Decolonization
  • Aboriginal justice; Aboriginal law
  • Teaching treaties in the classroom
  • Residential schools – intergenerational impact
  • Indigenous math and science
  • Indigenous literature, poetry and plays

Decolonizing and Indigenizing Education

Resource Type: Print

Resources related to decolonizing and Indigenizing education are available for borrowing at the Emma Stewart Resources Centre. This bibliography provides an annotated list of print and media resources to support your own learning and your classroom practice on topics such as:

  • Indigenous wisdom
  • Indigenous worldviews and ways of knowing
  • Indigenous knowledge systems
  • Cultural and traditional teachings
  • First Nations protocols
  • Indigenous methodologies
  • Anti-colonialism; decolonization
  • Decolonizing education
  • Indigenizing education
  • Indigenous leadership
  • Indigenous research methods
  • Aboriginal pedagogy; Red pedagogy
  • Indigenous law
  • Teaching treaties in the classroom
  • Truth and Reconciliation Commission report
  • Indigenous education – culture, language, identity
  • Elders and education
  • First Nations, Métis and Inuit student success
  • Indigenous stories

Indigenous Pedagogy and Perspectives

Resource Type: Print

Resources related to Indigenous pedagogy and perspectives are available for borrowing at the Emma Stewart Resources Centre. This bibliography provides an annotated list of print and media resources to support your own learning and your classroom practice on topics such as:

  • Indigenous worldviews
  • Indigenous knowledge and perspectives
  • Indigenous ways of knowing
  • First Nations protocols and methodologies
  • Cultural and traditional teachings
  • Red pedagogy
  • Decolonizing education
  • Teaching treaties in the classroom; treaty essential learnings
  • Indigenous education - language, culture and identity
  • Elders as teachers
  • Indigenizing education
  • Indigenous student success
  • culturally responsive pedagogy of relations
  • Indigenous storytelling
  • Indigenous values
  • First Nations, Métis and Inuit issues in Canada

Land-based and Place-based Learning

Resource Type: Print

Resources related to land-based and placed-based learning are available for borrowing at the Emma Stewart Resources Centre. This bibliography provides an annotated list of print and media resources to support your own learning and/or your classroom practice on topics such as:

  • Indigenous teachings for environmental sustainability
  • Plant teachings
  • Traditional plant uses; traditional medicines
  • Pedagogies of place
  • Place-based education: connecting learning to the community and the local context
  • Walking-based learning activities
  • Integrating Indigenous perspectives, worldviews and ways of knowing into curriculum

Native Studies 10

Resource Type: Print

Resources that will support the Native Studies 10 curriculum are available for borrowing at the Emma Stewart Resources Centre. This bibliography provides an annotated list of print and media resources to support your own professional learning and/or your classroom practice on topics such as:

  • Traditional/cultural teachings and values
  • Indigenous stories and myths
  • Racism in Canada; race relations
  • Land appropriation; relocation to reserves
  • Indigenous government
  • Aboriginal justice
  • Intergenerational impact of residential schools
  • History of Canada’s First Peoples
  • Historical Aboriginal settlement
  • Indigenous cultures and traditional practices
  • Indigenous art and architecture
  • Indigenous resistance

Native Studies 20

Resource Type: Print

Resources that will support the Native Studies 20 curriculum are available for borrowing at the Emma Stewart Resources Centre. This bibliography provides an annotated list of print and media resources to support your own professional learning and/or your classroom practice on topics such as:

  • Indigenous stereotyping in print materials and its impacts
  • Indigenous sacred traditions and spirituality
  • Race relations; racism in Canada
  • Aboriginal rights
  • Aboriginal issues
  • Aboriginal sovereignty and self-determination
  • Aboriginal law; Aboriginal justice
  • Treaties and land
  • Residential schools – intergenerational impacts and healing

Native Studies 30

Resource Type: Print

Resources that will support the Native Studies 30 curriculum are available for borrowing at the Emma Stewart Resources Centre. This bibliography provides an annotated list of print and media resources to support your own professional learning and/or your classroom practice on topics such as:

  • Indigenous sacred traditions and spirituality; Indigenous wisdom
  • Race relations; racism in Canada
  • Land appropriation; relocation to reserves
  • Aboriginal rights; Aboriginal issues
  • Aboriginal sovereignty and self-determination
  • Aboriginal law; Aboriginal justice
  • Treaties, treaty relationships, treaty land entitlement; treaty issues
  • Métis Nation
  • Residential schools – intergenerational impacts
  • Indigenous literature, plays
  • Indigenous stereotyping in print materials and its impacts
  • History of Canada’s First Peoples

Residential Schools, Truth and Reconciliation

Resource Type: Print

Resources related to residential schools, truth and reconciliation are available for borrowing at the Emma Stewart Resources Centre. This bibliography provides an annotated list of print and media resources to support your own professional learning and/or your classroom practice on topics such as:

  • History and impact of colonialism in Canada
  • Suppression and reclamation of cultural rites and ceremonies
  • Settler colonialism in Canada
  • Indigenous-settler relations
  • Reconciliation in practice
  • Land acknowledgements
  • Genocide and Indian residential schools
  • Indigenous resistance and resurgence
  • Racism and stereotypes
  • Indian Act
  • Aboriginal law; Aboriginal justice
  • Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada; Calls to Action
  • History of residential schools in Canada
  • Residential school experiences - autobiographical and biographical accounts; memoirs, stories and graphic novels
  • Residential schools, intergenerational impacts, and healing
  • Youth suicide
  • Child welfare practices
  • Sixties Scoop
  • Decolonizing education
  • Decolonizing discipline
  • Orange Shirt Day

Note: Some resources from the McDowell Foundation are currently unavailable due to website maintenance. 

Culture-Based School Mathematics for Reconciliation and Professional Development; Sharon Meyer, Glen Aikenhead, Kelley Cardinal, Danny Sylvestre, and Ted View

Resource Type: Print, Website, Media (video)

In Canada’s era of reconciliation, cross-cultural respect through mutual understanding was emphasized by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in its description of reconciliation. It matters how we do things among our three founding nations – Indigenous, English and French.

In this project, Indigenous and non-Indigenous researchers will work collaboratively with four non-Indigenous teachers in a small rural town. The teachers will learn to go back and forth between two ways of interacting with the world mathematically (Western and Indigenous). They will instruct their students through activities followed by discussions with the researchers about what they have learned concerning Western and Indigenous math. These outcomes will be closely monitored by two of the researchers.

At the same time the teachers will develop their own capacity for cross-cultural teaching that will continue to evolve after the research project is completed. Moreover, their cross-cultural teaching can expand into other subjects such as science, which has had a cross-cultural curriculum and textbooks for several years.

Exploring Indigenous Understanding and Reconciliation Through Art; Ann Donald, Roberta Ross, Cornelia Liberte, and Linda Wason-Ellam

Resource Type: Print, Website, Media (video)

The main goal of this participatory action research is to explore Indigenous understanding and Reconciliation through creating art. Land-based experiences will be guided by a Métis artist and Elders. Through art-making exercises, Grade 12 students and their teacher-researchers will learn to respect and honour our land and our first peoples in Saskatchewan. Cultural awareness and enrichment is essential in education.

The arts are a universal tool for communicating as they encourage students to participate actively in their learning environment and it is through art that students can appreciate cultural heritage and Indigenous ways of knowing. High school students and teacher-researchers need to know more about the Indigenous world than just what they can learn through text and numbers. Land-based art education teaches students how to experience, interpret, critique and use visual information. The deeper the connection to their experiences of the land and Indigenous ways of knowing, the deeper their creation of art. Students who experience the arts learn to interpret symbols and understand abstract ideas and gain a deeper knowing as a pathway towards reconciliation.

High School Teachers Working Towards Reconciliation: Examining the Teaching and Learning of Residential Schools; Dr. Tana Mitchell and Dr. Jennifer Tupper

Resource Type: Print, Website

Responding to the Call for Action in the Truth and Reconciliation (TRC) report, this project will explore how teachers integrate and teach about residential schools, how students make sense of themselves as Canadians as they learn about the history and legacy of residential schools and how classrooms can become a space for reconciliation.

History Underground: The Road to Reconciliation; Denee Repski and Justin Harrison

Resource Type: Print, Website, Media (video)

History Underground: The Road to Reconciliation is a project focused on providing students with an immersive learning experience where connections are made between the historical narratives (both colonial and Indigenous) and the current realities stemming from the legacy of these narratives.

As educators we both felt that there was a lack of genuine engagement from our students about the area of treaty education and reconciliation. Our intent with this project is to facilitate experiences where students are invited away from a traditional classroom dynamic in order to walk through some of the vital and emerging histories, stories, and experiences through the lens of reconciliation. This will be achieved through mindfully walking treaty land, building connections with community and agencies, and listening to the genuine voices that represent those communities and stories that have been too often marginalized or silenced.

In the end, students will gain a better understanding of who they are and what their role is in the road to reconciliation.

Improving Indigenous Students’ Success Through an Analysis and Implementation of Promising Teaching Practices; Terry Craig and Cheryl Treptow

Resource Type: Print, Website

This project outlines the journey of a diverse team of culturally responsive lead learners within a rural school system in Saskatchewan as they attempted to identify perceived barriers to Indigenous student success while designing a framework that endeavours to align promising practices and initiatives to better support educators.

Resource Type: Recordings Available Online

All the recordings of the Inspiring Success Speaker Series are available to view online. Please note that access to Rita Bouvier’s session is restricted to pre-registered participants. The recordings will be available in French at a later date.

The online Speaker Series is based on the policy imperatives of Inspiring Success: First Nations and Métis PreK-12 Education Policy Framework (Inspiring Success). The rationale for this policy framework is articulated in the historical, cultural, ecological, moral, economic and Student First imperatives.

Inspiring Success aims to create a provincial Prekindergarten to Grade 12 education system that foundationally places Indigenous knowledge systems, cultures and languages within the structures, policies and curricula to ensure an equitable and inclusive system that benefits all learners.

Speaker Series Speakers:

Speaker Imperative

Mary Culbertson

Historical

John Lagimodiere

Economic

Lieutenant Governor Russ Mirasty

Student First

Angie Caron

Student First

Renee Carriere, Mika Carriere, Naomi Carriere

Ecological

Rita Bouvier

Moral

Willie Ermine

Cultural

Contact: Felice McKay, felice.mckay@gov.sk.ca, Strategic Policy & Planning Branch

 

Learning Opportunities

To see what workshops are currently scheduled, please visit the Events Calendar.

Inviting Exploration of Treaty Outcomes Through Play in the Early Years

Format: Full-day face-to-face session or half-day virtual session.

Join us to explore some ways in which early learners can be invited to investigate the important concepts and teachings embedded in our Saskatchewan Treaty Education Outcomes though age-appropriate, play-based provocations and inquiry processes.

  • Examine Treaty Outcomes and their links to holistic inquiry and cross curricular connections.
  • Explore and create invitations to play as a potential vehicle for accessing Treaty Outcomes for early learners.
  • Critically review materials and resources for early learners when exploring Treaty Outcomes.

Understanding First Nations and Métis Perspectives

Format: Two-day face-to-face intensive session.

The four dimensions will be used as a framework to develop deeper understanding of the historical factors that contributed to the need for reconciliation and the political, economic, educational, and cultural contexts in which First Nations and Métis peoples are empowering themselves.

  • Construct deeper understanding of traditional First Nations, Métis and European worldviews.
  • Investigate the factors that contributed to the marginalization, loss of homeland and wardship of First Nations and Métis peoples and their intergenerational effects.
  • Develop understanding of the cycle of prejudice and consider ways to break it.
  • Identify ways First Nations and Métis peoples have empowered themselves since the 1969 White Paper that called for total assimilation.

Supporting Reconciliation in Saskatchewan Schools – The Sixties Scoop

Format: Ministry of Education – Government of Saskatchewan (online)

The purpose of this support material is to assist educators in using collaborative inquiry to engage in conversations and develop actions to deepen their own, their students’ and communities’ understanding of the sixties scoop and its legacies in Saskatchewan.

These materials may be used in a variety of contexts such as staff meetings, professional learning groups, workshops, school councils and community gatherings. The sample questions for conversations and actions may also be useful for individual teacher reflection and planning. It is important to involve First Nations and Métis Elders and community leaders in planning and dialogue concerning the sixties scoop.

Supports are provided for four conversations:

  • Conversation #1: What was the sixties scoop and why did it happen?
    • This conversation will guide individual and group reflection to increase understanding of the sixties scoop as a legacy of colonialism in Saskatchewan.
  • Conversation #2: What do we know about the personal, social and cultural impact of the sixties scoop?
    • This conversation will guide staff to reflect on what they understand about the personal, social and cultural impact of the sixties scoop in Saskatchewan and what can be done to learn more.
  • Conversation #3: When some sixties scoop family members are able to track down their missing loved ones and be reunited, what apprehensions, joys and challenges may be encountered in reclaiming themselves, their families and identities?
    • This conversation will guide reflections upon issues raised in sixties scoop research and resources such as the National Film Board documentary for CBC Docs POV online entitled Birth of a Family.
  • Conversation #4: Where do K-12 curricula provide opportunities to incorporate challenging topics such as the sixties scoop in classroom learning, school projects and community engagement?
    • This conversation will guide staff to reflect upon ways that the sixties scoop could be further investigated by students through the study of provincial curricula and curriculum-related school and community projects.

Networking Opportunities

Under development.