Education Through Indigenous Worldviews

Policy 1.12 Indigenous Education

Education through Indigenous worldviews cultivates holistic understanding of knowledge, the land, communities, and all relations while emphasizing that Indigenous ways of knowing are foundational to teaching and learning.

Resources

Aboriginal Resource List

Resource Type: Print

Aboriginal resources that will support provincial curricula are available for borrowing at the Emma Stewart Resources Centre. This bibliography provides an annotated list of print and media resources to support your own learning and your classroom practice on topics such as:

  • Ethical, racial, political, and treaty issues
  • Aboriginal rights and sovereignty
  • Impacts of colonialism
  • History of Indigenous peoples, pre- and post-Confederation
  • Indigenous stories and legends
  • Traditional and cultural teachings; Indigenous values
  • Indigenous worldviews and ways of knowing
  • Traditional medicines
  • Indigenous arts, dances, music and games
  • Indigenous cultures and languages
  • Decolonization
  • Aboriginal justice; Aboriginal law
  • Teaching treaties in the classroom
  • Residential schools – intergenerational impact
  • Indigenous math and science
  • Indigenous literature, poetry and plays

Decolonizing and Indigenizing Education

Resource Type: Print

Resources related to decolonizing and Indigenizing education are available for borrowing at the Emma Stewart Resources Centre. This bibliography provides an annotated list of print and media resources to support your own learning and your classroom practice on topics such as:

  • Indigenous wisdom
  • Indigenous worldviews and ways of knowing
  • Indigenous knowledge systems
  • Cultural and traditional teachings
  • First Nations protocols
  • Indigenous methodologies
  • Anti-colonialism; decolonization
  • Decolonizing education
  • Indigenizing education
  • Indigenous leadership
  • Indigenous research methods
  • Aboriginal pedagogy; Red pedagogy
  • Indigenous law
  • Teaching treaties in the classroom
  • Truth and Reconciliation Commission report
  • Indigenous education – culture, language, identity
  • Elders and education
  • First Nations, Métis and Inuit student success
  • Indigenous stories

Indigenous Pedagogy and Perspectives

Resource Type: Print

Resources related to Indigenous pedagogy and perspectives are available for borrowing at the Emma Stewart Resources Centre. This bibliography provides an annotated list of print and media resources to support your own learning and your classroom practice on topics such as:

  • Indigenous worldviews
  • Indigenous knowledge and perspectives
  • Indigenous ways of knowing
  • First Nations protocols and methodologies
  • Cultural and traditional teachings
  • Red pedagogy
  • Decolonizing education
  • Teaching treaties in the classroom; treaty essential learnings
  • Indigenous education - language, culture and identity
  • Elders as teachers
  • Indigenizing education
  • Indigenous student success
  • culturally responsive pedagogy of relations
  • Indigenous storytelling
  • Indigenous values
  • First Nations, Métis and Inuit issues in Canada

Land-based and Place-based Learning

Resource Type: Print

Resources related to land-based and placed-based learning are available for borrowing at the Emma Stewart Resources Centre. This bibliography provides an annotated list of print and media resources to support your own learning and/or your classroom practice on topics such as:

  • Indigenous teachings for environmental sustainability
  • Plant teachings
  • Traditional plant uses; traditional medicines
  • Pedagogies of place
  • Place-based education: connecting learning to the community and the local context
  • Walking-based learning activities
  • Integrating Indigenous perspectives, worldviews and ways of knowing into curriculum

Native Studies 10

Resource Type: Print

Resources that will support the Native Studies 10 curriculum are available for borrowing at the Emma Stewart Resources Centre. This bibliography provides an annotated list of print and media resources to support your own professional learning and/or your classroom practice on topics such as:

  • Traditional/cultural teachings and values
  • Indigenous stories and myths
  • Racism in Canada; race relations
  • Land appropriation; relocation to reserves
  • Indigenous government
  • Aboriginal justice
  • Intergenerational impact of residential schools
  • History of Canada’s First Peoples
  • Historical Aboriginal settlement
  • Indigenous cultures and traditional practices
  • Indigenous art and architecture
  • Indigenous resistance

Native Studies 20

Resource Type: Print

Resources that will support the Native Studies 20 curriculum are available for borrowing at the Emma Stewart Resources Centre. This bibliography provides an annotated list of print and media resources to support your own professional learning and/or your classroom practice on topics such as:

  • Indigenous stereotyping in print materials and its impacts
  • Indigenous sacred traditions and spirituality
  • Race relations; racism in Canada
  • Aboriginal rights
  • Aboriginal issues
  • Aboriginal sovereignty and self-determination
  • Aboriginal law; Aboriginal justice
  • Treaties and land
  • Residential schools – intergenerational impacts and healing

Native Studies 30

Resource Type: Print

Resources that will support the Native Studies 30 curriculum are available for borrowing at the Emma Stewart Resources Centre. This bibliography provides an annotated list of print and media resources to support your own professional learning and/or your classroom practice on topics such as:

  • Indigenous sacred traditions and spirituality; Indigenous wisdom
  • Race relations; racism in Canada
  • Land appropriation; relocation to reserves
  • Aboriginal rights; Aboriginal issues
  • Aboriginal sovereignty and self-determination
  • Aboriginal law; Aboriginal justice
  • Treaties, treaty relationships, treaty land entitlement; treaty issues
  • Métis Nation
  • Residential schools – intergenerational impacts
  • Indigenous literature, plays
  • Indigenous stereotyping in print materials and its impacts
  • History of Canada’s First Peoples

Residential Schools, Truth and Reconciliation

Resource Type: Print

Resources related to residential schools, truth and reconciliation are available for borrowing at the Emma Stewart Resources Centre. This bibliography provides an annotated list of print and media resources to support your own professional learning and/or your classroom practice on topics such as:

  • History and impact of colonialism in Canada
  • Suppression and reclamation of cultural rites and ceremonies
  • Settler colonialism in Canada
  • Indigenous-settler relations
  • Reconciliation in practice
  • Land acknowledgements
  • Genocide and Indian residential schools
  • Indigenous resistance and resurgence
  • Racism and stereotypes
  • Indian Act
  • Aboriginal law; Aboriginal justice
  • Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada; Calls to Action
  • History of residential schools in Canada
  • Residential school experiences - autobiographical and biographical accounts; memoirs, stories and graphic novels
  • Residential schools, intergenerational impacts, and healing
  • Youth suicide
  • Child welfare practices
  • Sixties Scoop
  • Decolonizing education
  • Decolonizing discipline
  • Orange Shirt Day

Note: Resources from the McDowell Foundation are currently unavailable due to website maintenance. 

Culture-Based School Mathematics for Reconciliation and Professional Development; Sharon Meyer, Glen Aikenhead, Kelley Cardinal, Danny Sylvestre, and Ted View

Resource Type: Print, Website, Media (video)

In Canada’s era of reconciliation, cross-cultural respect through mutual understanding was emphasized by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in its description of reconciliation. It matters how we do things among our three founding nations – Indigenous, English and French.

In this project, Indigenous and non-Indigenous researchers will work collaboratively with four non-Indigenous teachers in a small rural town. The teachers will learn to go back and forth between two ways of interacting with the world mathematically (Western and Indigenous). They will instruct their students through activities followed by discussions with the researchers about what they have learned concerning Western and Indigenous math. These outcomes will be closely monitored by two of the researchers.

At the same time the teachers will develop their own capacity for cross-cultural teaching that will continue to evolve after the research project is completed. Moreover, their cross-cultural teaching can expand into other subjects such as science, which has had a cross-cultural curriculum and textbooks for several years.

Exploring Indigenous Understanding and Reconciliation Through Art; Ann Donald, Roberta Ross, Cornelia Liberte, and Linda Wason-Ellam

Resource Type: Print, Website, Media (video)

The main goal of this participatory action research is to explore Indigenous understanding and Reconciliation through creating art. Land-based experiences will be guided by a Métis artist and Elders. Through art-making exercises, Grade 12 students and their teacher-researchers will learn to respect and honour our land and our first peoples in Saskatchewan. Cultural awareness and enrichment is essential in education.

The arts are a universal tool for communicating as they encourage students to participate actively in their learning environment and it is through art that students can appreciate cultural heritage and Indigenous ways of knowing. High school students and teacher-researchers need to know more about the Indigenous world than just what they can learn through text and numbers. Land-based art education teaches students how to experience, interpret, critique and use visual information. The deeper the connection to their experiences of the land and Indigenous ways of knowing, the deeper their creation of art. Students who experience the arts learn to interpret symbols and understand abstract ideas and gain a deeper knowing as a pathway towards reconciliation.

Exploring Students’ Relationships to Treaty Through the Treaty4Project; Naomi Sara Fortier-Frecon and Leia Laing

Resource Type: Print, Website, Media (PowerPoint)

Treaty 4: The next generation project (also known as Treaty4Project) is an educative project that allows students to explore the idea of treaty citizenship in order to understand the role of their generation in Treaty 4 territory (Saskatchewan) today and in the future. The project brought together an Elder, a Cree/Metis artist, university professors, activists, education students and several resources into the classroom in order to provide students with a strong foundation of knowledge enabling them to tackle this very complex idea.

This project will explore students’ understandings of themselves as treaty people following participation in a conference aimed at unpacking understandings around treaties. The conference explores treaty citizenship in a number of ways including understanding their own roles and responsibilities in treaty and working with an Indigenous artist to create work inspired by questions of citizenship and treaty. The project is a learning experience for students and teachers alike and strives to reinforce inclusive viewpoints of Saskatchewan’s history and to promote the development of student perspectives on treaty citizenship.

High School Teachers Working Towards Reconciliation: Examining the Teaching and Learning of Residential Schools; Dr. Tana Mitchell and Dr. Jennifer Tupper

Resource Type: Print, Website

Responding to the Call for Action in the Truth and Reconciliation (TRC) report, this project will explore how teachers integrate and teach about residential schools, how students make sense of themselves as Canadians as they learn about the history and legacy of residential schools and how classrooms can become a space for reconciliation.

History Underground: The Road to Reconciliation; Denee Repski and Justin Harrison

Resource Type: Print, Website, Media (video)

History Underground: The Road to Reconciliation is a project focused on providing students with an immersive learning experience where connections are made between the historical narratives (both colonial and Indigenous) and the current realities stemming from the legacy of these narratives.

As educators we both felt that there was a lack of genuine engagement from our students about the area of treaty education and reconciliation. Our intent with this project is to facilitate experiences where students are invited away from a traditional classroom dynamic in order to walk through some of the vital and emerging histories, stories, and experiences through the lens of reconciliation. This will be achieved through mindfully walking treaty land, building connections with community and agencies, and listening to the genuine voices that represent those communities and stories that have been too often marginalized or silenced.

In the end, students will gain a better understanding of who they are and what their role is in the road to reconciliation.

Identifying Consistent Social Supports That Would Benefit FNIM Adult Learners at Royal West Campus; Kimberley Macleod, Deidra Evans, and Cody Dill

Resource Type: Print, Website

The focus of this research was to learn from First Nations, Métis and Inuit students attending an alternative adult learning program about their experiences with both supportive and non-supportive teaching environments.

The students described the importance of community or a sense of belonging, cultural teachings within the school, relationships with teachers or the school community and resilience as positive experiences within the system. They also outlined racism, a lack of connection to teachers or the school community transience and urbanization, poverty, grief and trauma and mental health and addiction struggles as negative experiences that impacted their education.

The research recommends increasing role models and mentors for Indigenous students, providing social workers and career counsellors in the schools, early interventions, nutrition programs, increased hands-on or creative learning, enhanced transitional supports and inclusion of culture and family in the school community as ways to support First Nations, Métis and Inuit students.

Improving Indigenous Students’ Success Through an Analysis and Implementation of Promising Teaching Practices; Terry Craig and Cheryl Treptow

Resource Type: Print, Website

This project outlines the journey of a diverse team of culturally responsive lead learners within a rural school system in Saskatchewan as they attempted to identify perceived barriers to Indigenous student success while designing a framework that endeavours to align promising practices and initiatives to better support educators.

Revitalizing Nêhiyawewin: Our Language, Stories and Perspectives; Gail Mackay, Linda Wason-Ellam, Darlene Arcand, Pamela Fosseneuve, Coreen Sakebow, and Dwayne Swiftwolfe

Resource Type: Print, Website

This research project aims to explore the development of storytelling curricula grounded in Nêhiyaw language and knowledge at a school in Saskatoon. Working with visiting Elders who are story keepers, Cree immersion speakers in grades 1 to 3 will listen to Elder stories and participate in a number of oral language storying activities in Cree. Indigenous storytelling for young learners is a pedagogical springboard for holistic learning, concept building and experiential learning. The research will explore the impact on both students and their teachers.

Saskatchewan French Immersion School: A Case Study in Best Practice for Aboriginal Students; Michael Cottrell, Ted View, Suzanne Bronkhurst, and Kelly Cardinal

Resource Type: Print, Website

Responding to the needs of Indigenous learners to ensure more equitable outcomes in the education system is a pressing issue within the province. This project is a case study exploring the success of Indigenous students at a French emersion school in the province where the majority of Indigenous students are performing at or above grade level. Using a “promising practice” approach this research aims to identify school contexts and factors contributing to this achievement so that they may be better understood and extended more broadly.

The Journey to Reclamation Through Oral Tradition; Dianne Peekeekoot, Charlotte Campbell, Shaun Sasakamoose, Loretta Ballantyne, and Irene Dumais

Resource Type: Print, Website, Media (video)

This project follows up on a completed project and examines the impact on students of incorporating Elders into grades 7 to 9 Cree classes. The Elders will share stories in Cree to support both language and cultural fluency. Including Elders in the classroom will allow students to interact with both their peers and adults in traditional ways while learning traditional knowledge.

The Muskrat/Wuchusk Project; Renée Carrière

Resource Type: Print, Website, Media (video)

This project examines how to connect curriculum content and Ministry outcomes with Indigenous science and ways of knowing in secondary science courses. The study integrates local community knowledge, scientific data collection and Indigenous and Western ways of knowing in ways that engage students in meaningful outdoor education.

The Muskrat/Wuchusk Project: The Practices; Renée Carrière and Bonnie Werner

Resource Type: Print, Website

This project builds on a recently completed project and continues to examine how to connect curriculum content and Ministry outcomes with Indigenous science and ways of knowing in secondary science courses. The study integrates local community knowledge, scientific data collection and Indigenous and Western ways of knowing in ways that engage students in meaningful outdoor education.

Using Traditional Aboriginal Teachings and the Leaders in Me (7 Habits) Concept to Improve Communication and Technology Skills in the Nêhiyawewin Cree Language and Culture Program; Norine Tourangeau, Sheila Kennedy, and Lesley Walters

Resource Type: Print, Website

How can we incorporate technology as a way to improve students’ communication skills in a Cree classroom using Traditional Aboriginal Teachings and the Leader in Me concept?

This study will include Aboriginal pedagogy such as the sharing circle and interviews to collect data from Elders, traditional knowledge keepers, community resource members, parents, students and teachers. Their experiences will be valuable to highlighting the importance of Traditional Aboriginal Teachings. In doing so, interviews will allow the teacher-researchers to talk to, discuss one-on-one and on an individual basis, ways to improve educational practice.

This collaborative research effort will provide examples of Cree instructional practices. Lastly, it is our hope that the findings will serve as a constant reminder that the work of Cree language retention is far from over and that there is much work to be done in this area.

Learning Opportunities

To see what workshops are currently scheduled, please visit the Events Calendar.

Inviting Exploration of Treaty Outcomes Through Play in the Early Years

Format: Full-day face-to-face session or half-day virtual session.

Join us to explore some ways in which early learners can be invited to investigate the important concepts and teachings embedded in our Saskatchewan Treaty Education Outcomes though age-appropriate, play-based provocations and inquiry processes.

  • Examine Treaty Outcomes and their links to holistic inquiry and cross curricular connections.
  • Explore and create invitations to play as a potential vehicle for accessing Treaty Outcomes for early learners.
  • Critically review materials and resources for early learners when exploring Treaty Outcomes.

Understanding First Nations and Métis Perspectives

Format: Two-day face-to-face intensive session.

The four dimensions will be used as a framework to develop deeper understanding of the historical factors that contributed to the need for reconciliation and the political, economic, educational, and cultural contexts in which First Nations and Métis peoples are empowering themselves.

  • Construct deeper understanding of traditional First Nations, Métis and European worldviews.
  • Investigate the factors that contributed to the marginalization, loss of homeland and wardship of First Nations and Métis peoples and their intergenerational effects.
  • Develop understanding of the cycle of prejudice and consider ways to break it.
  • Identify ways First Nations and Métis peoples have empowered themselves since the 1969 White Paper that called for total assimilation.

Networking Opportunities

Under development.